Menu icoMenu232White icoCross32White
<
>

Ils parlent de nous

Aucun résultat pour cette recherche.

Seuls les 100 premiers résultats sont affichés. Veuillez affiner votre recherche.

Ces « Américains accidentels » qui paient des impôts aux États-Unis...

Ces « Américains accidentels » qui paient des impôts aux États-Unis...

La Croix

Une association de Franco-Américains espère que le voyage d’Emmanuel Macron aux États-Unis permettra de les sortir d’un inextricable imbroglio fiscal.

Certains Franco-Américains vont scruter de près la visite d’Emmanuel Macron aux États-Unis. Avec l’espoir d’en finir avec la situation ubuesque dans laquelle ils se trouvent depuis que l’administration fiscale américaine a décidé de leur faire payer des impôts, même s’ils n’ont plus aucun lien avec les États-Unis.

« Tout a commencé en 2010 », raconte Fabien Lehagre, le très actif animateur de l’Association des « Américains accidentels ». Réagissant à un scandale de comptes en Suisse non déclarés, l’administration Obama oblige alors les banques du monde entier à recenser leurs clients américains afin de leur faire payer des impôts aux États-Unis.

Depuis lors, les procédures bancaires se sont donc durcies, notamment en France, vis-à-vis des citoyens américains. « Dès que la banque voit qu’on est né là-bas, elle exige des tonnes de papier, refuse de nous laisser souscrire certains placements, voire ferme nos comptes pour éviter les ennuis », s’insurge Fabien Lehagre, né en Californie mais parti des États-Unis à 18 mois.

Une fois identifiés, les citoyens américains sont rattrapés par le fisc américain. Certes, des accords existent pour éviter les doubles impositions, mais les lois fiscales sont différentes et parfois ce qui n’est pas imposable en France l’est quand même aux États-Unis. Et l’addition peut alors vite grimper.

Beaucoup de ces contribuables jugent impensable de payer des impôts dans un pays où ils n’ont passé que quelques semaines. Ceux qui sont tentés d’abandonner leur nationalité américaine se retrouvent face à une longue procédure coûtant plusieurs dizaines de milliers d’euros. Aussi, après avoir saisi la justice, alerté Bercy et mobilisé les députés, les « Américains accidentels » rêvent d’une solution diplomatique pour sortir de la nasse.

Mathieu Castagnet

Lire la suite...
24 avril 2018
‘Accidental<br />
Americans’ living abroad fight tax bill from Uncle Sam

‘Accidental
Americans’ living abroad fight tax bill from Uncle Sam

NBC

PARIS — Tom Wallis was born here and has spent his entire life in France, but it turns out that the 40-year-old entrepreneur from Grenoble owes tens of thousands of dollars in taxes to the United States.

Wallis' mother was French, but he holds U.S. citizenship through his American father. He had previously visited his father's family in the U.S., but other than that he says he has no real connection to the country.

But three years ago, Wallis found out he was still subject to U.S. tax law.

He is one of potentially thousands of "accidental Americans" around the world — U.S. citizens who neither live in the country nor have any real ties to the United States.

Under a citizenship-based taxation system in place in the United States, people like Wallis are subject to U.S. taxes on their global income, no matter where they live.

Wallis hired lawyers to fill out the necessary paperwork to try to comply with the U.S. tax authority, but when his legal fees reached over $61,000 (50,000 euros), he says he had to stop the process. "It was too much," he said.

His lawyers told him he would owe $115,000 in U.S. taxes after he sold his business in 2013, even though he had paid a tax on the sale in France. He says he won't pay even though the U.S. has not explicitly asked him for any money yet.

"There is no way," Wallis said, adding that it's money he could invest in France, where his family lives. "I am OK to pay what I owe in France, but to the U.S. — I can't accept it ... I think it's a robbery."

He says he doesn't know what will happen next, but he won't be hiding from the authorities, because he feels that he has done nothing wrong.

"I won't pay. Even if I have to go to jail, I won't pay it for sure because it's too unfair."

There has been a growing movement by "accidental Americans," particularly in France, to try to get U.S. authorities to realize the burden their American citizenship is adding to their lives. Many are hoping that French President Emmanuel Macron will raise the issue during his state visit to the U.S. this week.

Unlike other advanced nations, the United States enforces a tax system based on citizenship rather than residency. In 2010, Congress enacted the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act, also known as FATCA, to crack down on tax evasion by Americans with financial assets abroad after a Swiss bank scandal showed U.S. taxpayers hid millions of dollars overseas. The law requires foreign banks to report about financial accounts held by U.S. citizens to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) in the United States.

As a result, many "accidental Americans" learned they may owe taxes in the United States after getting contacted by the banks in their home countries.

Fabien Lehagre, 33, a commercial manager, found himself in that exact situation.

Born in Mountain View, California, in 1984 to a French father and a Singaporean-American mother, Lehagre was 2 when his parents divorced and he and his father moved to France.

He grew up and studied there, and now works in Paris.

In 2014, his French bank contacted him asking for his U.S. tax identification number. Thinking it was a mistake, Lehagre ignored the request despite repeated warnings. The requests didn't stop.

He did some research and discovered that he was also an "accidental American" and could face a looming tax bill from the United States.

Lehagre, who doesn't speak English, says although he has only lived in the United States for a short time as a toddler,never studied there, voted or paid taxes, he was being "forced into the administrative system that obliges [him] to fill out forms, pay a lawyer and have [his] bank accounts scrutinized."

Rescinding his U.S. citizenship would cost Lehagre more than $3,000 on top of the legal and accounting fees to start the procedure.

Faced with a prospect of a significant financial strain, Lehagre is considering his options and hoping someone in the United States will awaken to the plight of the thousands of people like him.

Mojgan Ghanipour, a tax accountant from San Francisco who has been working in France on and off since 1989, has advised many such clients.

Ghanipour says even if they don't end up paying the taxes they may owe to the United States, taking care of even the simplest case can set them back over $700. But the more they earn or the more complicated their financial structure is, the faster the procedural costs pile up.

"It's very frustrating for these people," she said. "It's not good news when we tell them what they are faced with and have to do to comply with the American law."

If they don't comply, Ghanipour says they are penalized by the French banks, which can face penalties of their own if they don't cooperate with the U.S. tax authority. As the result, some may find it difficult to open accounts, get loans or change banks.

In addition to the financial restrictions many claim to have experienced as a result of FATCA, some also talk about "moral damages" — like anxiety and distress — that their situation is causing them.

One of the most high-profile "accidental Americans" is British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, who has previously said that forcing someone like him to pay U.S. taxes was "absolutely outrageous." Johnson was born to British parents in New York City in 1964, and moved to Britain when he was 5. Johnson, 53, the former mayor of London, renounced his U.S. citizenship in 2016. According to local media, he had to settle a U.S. tax bill on the earlier sale of his London house in 2015.

In France, realizing the scope of the problem, Lehagre started a Facebook campaign last year to give people like him a voice.

In the first year, a hundred such Americans living in France reached out to him. To date, 450 people have signed up and more than 1,200 have made inquiries. Lehagre estimates there could be more than 10,000 "accidental Americans" in France alone, but there are no exact estimates of their numbers worldwide.

Lehagre has reached out to both French and U.S. officials asking them to do something to help these bi-nationals and started an association to bring them together.

His association is asking the United States to switch to a tax system based on residency and to allow "accidental Americans" the ability to freely renounce their U.S. citizenship, without having to comply with the IRS.

"I used to be so proud of telling everyone that I was born in the United States," Lehagre said. "Today, I am not feeling pride but rather disappointment. ... I feel like I'm being held up."

Nancy Ing reported from Paris. Yuliya Talmazan reported from London.

CORRECTION (April 23, 2018, 4:13 a.m. ET): An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that Fabien Lehagre worked in Austria during 2014.

Lire la suite...
22 avril 2018
Ces Français nés aux Etats-Unis et poursuivis par le fisc américain

Ces Français nés aux Etats-Unis et poursuivis par le fisc américain

Le Progrès

Ils se nomment eux-mêmes les « Américains accidentels » et portent leur double nationalité comme un fardeau. Car s’ils sont nés au pays de l’oncle Sam, ils n’y vivent pas, n’y travaillent pas… mais sont pourtant considérés comme des contribuables pour le fisc américain. Là-bas, l’impôt est en effet prélevé sur la base de la citoyenneté et non sur celle de la résidence.

Stéphanie, installée à Lyon depuis plusieurs années, se retrouve dans cette situation ubuesque : «Je veux ouvrir un compte bancaire avec mon conjoint? Je ne peux pas. On veut acheter un appartement? On ne peut pas faire d’emprunt. Tant que je ne régularise pas la situation, je ne suis pas légale», explique-t-elle. Une association se mobilise pour faire évoluer la législation et pour que le sujet soit abordé lors de la visite du président Macron aux Etats-Unis, qui commence ce lundi.

Lire la suite...
21 avril 2018
Tax Day maneuvering

Tax Day maneuvering

SPEAKING ACCIDENTALLY: Here’s a potential sleeper issue for Trump and President Emmanuel Macron of France, via Bloomberg — the 10,000 or so “accidental Americans” in France who want an easy way to renounce U.S. citizenship. It’s an issue that’s become more pronounced since the U.S. passed the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act, with the IRS seeking out more and more citizens who were born in America but moved abroad at a young age. “Marc Le Fur, a French member of parliament who has taken up the accidental Americans’ case, is pushing for relief. ‘French banks are terrified about their relations with the U.S., that they’ll do anything’ Le Fur said in an interview. ‘We shouldn’t be acting as an auxiliary of the U.S. tax authorities.’”

Lire la suite...
17 avril 2018
Plight of French ‘Américains Accidentels’ gets major US media coverage

Plight of French ‘Américains Accidentels’ gets major US media coverage

The plight of a group of French citizens who, typically as a result of having been born in the US while their parents were there only briefly, have American citizenship that they say is causing them major difficulties and expense, has received potentially breakthrough coverage by a major American media organisation.

In a story datelined today, Bloomberg reports how these ‘Accidental Americans’ in France are “[pressing French president Press Emmanuel] Macron for relief” from the US’s Internal Revenue Service, citing such difficulties as the fact that they are being denied basic banking services in the country they regard as their only home.

“The plight of the ‘Accidental Americans’ in France – there are an estimated 10,000 of them – may be discussed by President Macron with his US counterpart Donald Trump during an end-April state visit to Washington,” the Bloomberg report says, echoing a report here last month.

A number of French media organisations have also covered the situation affecting French citizens with American passports, including La Dépêche, in December, and Le Figaro and Les Échos in February.



Bloomberg begins its report by telling the story of Marilyn Wiles-Mooij, who “doesn’t even know why her parents were in the US when she was born 67 years ago near Atlanta”, only that they came back to France when she was a month old, but who has recently been targeted by the IRS for $3,000 in tax it says she owes. The US says she owed this tax because she didn’t pay any income tax in France during a particular year, when, she says, she had been home taking are of her handicapped husband.

“All we’re asking,” Wiles-Mooij is quoted as telling Bloomberg, “is for is a simple and free way to renounce our citizenship.”

Bloomberg also quotes Marc Le Fur (pictured right, above), a French member of parliament who has taken up the accidental Americans’ case, as saying: “We shouldn’t be acting as an auxiliary of the U.S. tax authorities.”

Th Bloomberg report notes that France’s banking association says a ‘diplomatic way ‘ is best way to address the issue, but that some French banks – which it doesn’t name – “are nevertheless fighting FATCA in French courts”.

The report also notes that France’s administrative Supreme Court “is due to rule around the end of the year on a claim that the application of FATCA is unconstitutional, on grounds that it’s not reciprocal, and that it violates French and European data protection legislation.

In a development that has emerged since the Bloomberg report was published, French Senator Jacky Deromedi has tabled a motion “inviting the government to take into account the situation affecting [France’s] accidental Americans”, which will be discussed in the Senate and a vote taken on 15 May, according to Fabien Lehagre (pictured left, above), a 33-year-old French citizen who has been leading the cause of les ‘Américains Accidentels’.

Lehagre, who was born near San Francisco but brought to France at the age of 18 months by his (French) father, became increasingly frustrated by the growing demands of the IRS as FATCA took hold, and in 2015 founded the Association des Américains Accidentels (Accidental American Association, or AAA) in an effort to lobby for a fairer system.

It now has around 440 members, with about 15 joining each week, Lehagre told Bloomberg.

FATCA and les Américains Accidentels’

As reported here in February, French ‘Américains Accidentels’ like Lehagre have found themselves caught up in a problem that has been affecting American expatriates ever since the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act was signed into law by President Obama in 2010.

Because the US – unlike every other country in the world except Eritrea – taxes its citizens on their worldwide income even when they live abroad, and because the US has forced foreign financial institutions to help it to enforce this rule, American expats have increasingly themselves unwanted by foreign banks, insurance companies and wealth managers ever since the law was passed.

Lire la suite...
16 avril 2018
‘Accidental Americans’ in France Press Macron for IRS Relief

‘Accidental Americans’ in France Press Macron for IRS Relief

Marilyn Wiles-Mooij doesn’t even know why her parents were in the U.S. when she was born 67 years ago near Atlanta. Her British military pilot father and French mother went back to Europe when she was a month old. She has lived in France ever since.

She stopped renewing her U.S. passport when she was in her early 20s, and thought that meant she was no longer American. Until 2010. That’s when the retired hotel marketing consultant got a letter from her bank telling her that because she was born in the U.S., she had to fill out forms for the Internal Revenue Service. She ignored it.

A year later, a more insistent letter and another bank closing her accounts drove her to the U.S. consulate, which had no record of her renouncing her citizenship. Doing that would mean paying thousands of dollars in fees and settling outstanding taxes, she was told. So she spent a year getting a U.S. social security number, filled out forms and was stunned when the IRS told her in 2016 that she owed $3,000 for a year when she paid no income tax in France because she was taking care of her handicapped husband. She’s contesting.

“I never asked to be American,” Wiles-Mooij said. “All we’re asking for is a simple and free way to renounce our citizenship.”

The plight of the“accidental Americans” in France like Wiles-Mooij -- there are an estimated 10,000 of them -- may be discussed by President Emmanuel Macron with his U.S. counterpart Donald Trump during an end-April state visit to Washington.

Swiss Scandal
They’ve been swept up in Fatca, or the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act, a 2010 U.S. measure forcing banks worldwide to scour client lists and report anyone who could be a U.S. citizen, or face being barred from operating in the U.S. Fatca was passed in the aftermath of scandals involving Swiss banks helping wealthy Americans avoid taxes, but has ensnared millions of U.S. citizens of modest means.

Nearly 100 countries have signed treaties with the U.S. to turn over tax information of potential American citizens, even though the U.S. doesn’t reciprocate. The U.S. is the only advanced nation that taxes citizens on worldwide income even when they live abroad.

Marc Le Fur, a French member of parliament who has taken up the accidental Americans’ case, is pushing for relief. “French banks are terrified about their relations with the U.S., that they’ll do anything” Le Fur said in an interview. “We shouldn’t be acting as an auxiliary of the U.S. tax authorities.” France’s banking association says a “diplomatic way ” is best way to address the issue. Some are nevertheless fighting Fatca in French courts.

‘Américains Accidentels’
France’s administrative Supreme Court is due to rule around the end of the year on a case that claims the application of Fatca is unconstitutional. The two main arguments presented last October by Patrice Spinosi, the lawyer handing the case: the French constitution requires treaties to be reciprocal and Fatca violates French and European laws protecting personal data.


Fabien Lehagre, left, and Patrice Spinosi.Photographer: Eric Piermont/AFP via Getty Images
“We have a strong case on both points, but only have to win on one of them and Fatca become unenforceable in France,” Spinosi said. “This a major affront to our constitutional system.”

Meanwhile, the lower house of parliament has formed a bi-partisan committee to look into the steps the government can take to defend the “Accidental Americans.” MPs from Macron’s party are writing him to ask that he raise it with Trump during his April 23-25 visit.

The Association

The flurry of activity stems from lobbying by the Association of Accidental Americans, founded in 2015 by Fabien Lehagre, a 33-year-old French salesman at a gas company in Brittany. Lehagre, born near San Francisco -- where his French father worked as a waiter -- moved to France when he was 18 months old, never learned English and never renewed the U.S. passport he acquired at birth. That didn’t stop his bank identifying him as American.

Lehagre received a letter from his bank in 2014 asking him to provide his social security number, which he’d never heard of, and fill out a series of IRS forms. After learning that on average it costs between 10,000 and 20,000 euros to renounce U.S. citizenship, Lehagre formed the association and started lobbying French government officials.

The association now has 440 members, with about 15 joining each week, Lehagre said. Members say their French banks have arbitrarily closed accounts or withheld U.S. taxes. Some have spent thousands on legal advice to try to settle their U.S. taxes.

Second-Class Citizen
Laurent Saint-Martin, an MP from Macron’s party who is joint chair with Le Fur of the parliamentary committee looking into the issue, said he expects to present their report before the summer recess. While powerless to affect U.S. legislation, they’ll propose measures preventing French banks from discriminating against clients for being dual nationals, he said.

In the meantime, Marilyn Miles-Wooij’s bank won’t let her buy certain savings instruments because they have different tax treatments in the U.S. and France.

“I am a second class citizen in France because of a citizenship I don’t want,” she said.

Gregory Viscusi — With assistance by Lynnley Browning

Lire la suite...
16 avril 2018
L'enfer administratif des « Américains accidentels »

L'enfer administratif des « Américains accidentels »

Nés aux États-Unis, des milliers de Français se retrouvent aujourd'hui dans l'illégalité faute d'avoir déclaré leurs revenus outre-Atlantique. Explications.
PAR BAUDOUIN ESCHAPASSE
Publié le 13/04/2018 à 14:54 | Le Point.fr


Des milliers de Français, nés outre-Atlantique, vivent aujourd'hui une situation kafkaïenne. Considérés par le fisc américain comme des « resquilleurs » même s'ils sont français et à jour de leurs impôts en France, ils doivent régulariser leur situation et payer de lourdes pénalités. Mais ils connaissent aussi des discriminations dans l'accès aux services financiers.

Lire aussi : Des Français dans le collimateur du fisc américain

Comment en est-on arrivé là ? Régis Bismuth, professeur à l'école de droit de Sciences Po, décortique pour Le Point cet épineux dossier. Il témoignera, le 17 avril, devant une commission parlementaire spécialement créée pour traiter du problème.

Le Point : L'Internal Revenue Service (IRS), l'agence gouvernementale américaine chargée de la collecte de l'impôt, exige que des milliers de Français régularisent leur situation. Pourquoi ?



Régis Bismuth, professeur à l’école de droit de Sciences-Po, doit être auditionné, le 17 avril, par la mission parlementaire instituée par Marc Le Fur, vice-président de l'Assemblée nationale.


Régis Bismuth : En droit fiscal américain, l'impôt est prélevé sur la base de la citoyenneté et non sur celle de la seule résidence. C'est le principe de « citizenship based taxation ». Or, le droit du sol prévaut aux États-Unis, ce qui fait que tout individu né sur le territoire américain est potentiellement un « citoyen US » : en tout cas ce que l'administration américaine désigne sous le nom de « personne américaine » (ou « US person »). Depuis l'adoption du Fatca (ou Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act) par le Congrès en 2010, ces US persons sont dorénavant visées par le fisc américain, même si elles sont contribuables d'autres États et n'ont d'autre lien avec les États-Unis que leur lieu de naissance.
Le simple fait d'être né aux États-Unis fait de dizaines, voire de centaines de milliers de personnes dans le monde des potentiels contribuables fraudeurs
Quel est l'objectif de cette nouvelle réglementation ?

Ce texte a été adopté après le scandale UBS où des conseillers de cet établissement bancaire suisse avaient démarché des citoyens américains pour leur proposer de soustraire une partie de leurs revenus à l'impôt. Le Fatca a pour objectif de lutter contre l'évasion fiscale outre-Atlantique en obligeant les banques localisées en dehors des États-Unis de déclarer à l'IRS les avoirs détenus par des US persons. Le problème est que, depuis son adoption, le simple fait d'être né aux États-Unis fait de dizaines, voire de centaines de milliers de personnes dans le monde des potentiels contribuables fraudeurs, et ce, même s'ils n'ont vécu que quelques mois sur le sol américain après leur naissance. C'est le cas par exemple de l'ancien maire de Londres, Boris Johnson, devenu depuis ministre des Affaires étrangères du Royaume-Uni.

Combien de Français sont concernés ?

Aucune statistique n'existe à ce sujet. Mais ce sont potentiellement des dizaines de milliers de personnes, voire des centaines de milliers à l'échelon européen. Cependant, soyons clairs. Quand bien même il n'y aurait que cinq personnes concernées, ce dossier pose des problèmes de principe.

Reprenons : le Fatca exige que les établissements bancaires transmettent au fisc américain des données personnelles sur leurs clients, s'ils sont US persons...

Oui. La législation Fatca fait peser des obligations de conduite spécifiques aux établissements financiers en exigeant d'eux notamment d'identifier les US persons. Celles-ci sont en premier lieu détectées par leur lieu de naissance, qui est l'information la plus facile à obtenir. Certaines banques peuvent aussi demander à leurs clients de remplir divers formulaires consistant à s'autocertifier en tant que non-Américain, de transmettre des copies de livrets de famille, notamment pour traquer les US persons qui se dissimuleraient dans certains angles morts, par exemple s'ils sont nés hors des États-Unis mais de parents américains.

En substance, les États-Unis usent de leur puissance économique pour assurer l'extraterritorialité de leur droit
Mais comment une loi américaine peut-elle avoir une application extraterritoriale ?

En premier lieu, il faut mentionner qu'un traité a été conclu entre les États-Unis et la France en 2013 (ratifié en 2014) dans lequel cette dernière accepte que la loi Fatca s'applique aux institutions financières françaises (article 4 du traité). Si l'on consulte les travaux parlementaires relatifs à la ratification de cet accord, on se rend compte aisément que la France y a consenti sous la contrainte. En effet, les institutions financières ne se conformant pas au Fatca sont frappées d'une retenue à la source de 30 % sur certains paiements en provenance des États-Unis – autant dire une exclusion de facto du marché américain qui était inenvisageable. Si formellement il n'y a pas d'application extraterritoriale du Fatca, car la France a accepté cette loi étrangère en vertu d'un traité, il n'est pas excessif de dire qu'en substance, les États-Unis usent de leur puissance économique pour assurer l'extraterritorialité de leur droit.

D'autres accords internationaux sont aussi intervenus…

En effet, cette contrainte pesant sur l'ensemble des institutions financières a permis aux États-Unis de conclure en l'espace de quelque mois plus d'une centaine de traités Fatca avec d'autres États afin que ceux-ci transmettent des informations sur les US persons qui vivent sur leur sol. En contrepartie, l'IRS devait transmettre des informations sur les nationaux des autres États se trouvant sur le sol américain. Il s'est avéré en pratique que ces accords sont très asymétriques, les États-Unis recevant une palette d'informations bien plus large qu'ils n'en transmettent. On peut ajouter à cela que le droit des États fédérés permet le maintien de structures très opaques avec des règles qui s'apparentent à celles des paradis fiscaux. Toute idée de réciprocité est restée lettre morte.

Les États-Unis sont-ils le seul pays à avoir adopté une telle réglementation coercitive ?

Oui. C'est un cas unique lorsqu'on tient compte de son ampleur. Et l'on pourrait même se demander dans quelle mesure les contraintes exercées sur le territoire français par les institutions financières, qui agissent en application du Fatca, sont conformes ou non au droit international. Un précédent est intéressant pour comprendre le caractère ubuesque de cette situation. C'est celui de l'Érythrée qui applique une taxe à taux fixe de 2 % à l'ensemble de ses nationaux quel que soit leur lieu de résidence. Il a été fait état que les services diplomatiques et consulaires érythréens s'employaient à collecter cette taxe à l'étranger en ayant recours à des mesures de contraintes (non-renouvellement de passeport ou refus de communication de certains documents administratifs). Ces agissements ont fait l'objet d'une enquête de la part des services de police au Royaume-Uni et le Foreign Office a considéré qu'il s'agissait d'une violation du droit international. Cette taxe visant la diaspora érythréenne a même été condamnée en 2011 par le Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies dans le cadre de la résolution 2023. On y lit que « l'Érythrée doit cesser d'avoir recours à l'extorsion, à la violence, à la fraude et à d'autres moyens illicites de percevoir des impôts en dehors de l'Érythrée auprès de ses nationaux ou d'autres individus d'origine érythréenne ». En France et ailleurs, la contrainte résultant du Fatca s'exerce différemment. Mais si ces personnes ne se conforment pas à ces exigences, elles peuvent se voir refuser des services financiers de base comme l'accès à un compte bancaire. Certaines banques ont une position plus radicale en refusant simplement d'offrir des services financiers à des clients présentant des indices d'américanité...

On pourrait même se demander dans quelle mesure les contraintes exercées sur le territoire français (...) en application du Fatca sont conformes ou non au droit international
Être à jour de ses impôts en France ne suffit visiblement pas. Comment ces personnes peuvent-elles éviter un redressement fiscal ?

En fait, elles ne peuvent l'éviter, car deux options s'offrent à elles. La première est de se mettre en conformité et de régler annuellement ses impôts aux États-Unis. La seconde est de renoncer à leur nationalité américaine. Mais même dans ce cas, il faut se mettre à jour de sa situation fiscale. C'est ce qu'a fait Boris Johnson. Pris dans les fourches caudines du Fatca, il a dû payer à l'IRS un impôt sur les plus-values lors de la cession de sa résidence londonienne alors que cette plus-value n'était pas imposable au Royaume-Uni.

Depuis la promulgation, le 2 janvier 2015, d'un décret officialisant l'accord signé entre Paris et Washington, les Français sont visés. Comment peuvent-ils réagir ?

Un recours contentieux a été introduit en octobre 2017 devant le Conseil d'État et deux éléments sont au cœur du débat. En premier lieu, l'application non réciproque de l'accord et en second lieu la question de savoir si le transfert massif de ces données à l'IRS respecte le droit à la protection des données personnelles. Des recours devant les juridictions pénales peuvent être envisagés, car ont été constatées des discriminations dans l'accès à certains services fondées sur une nationalité vraie ou supposée. Sur le plan politique, on peut aussi souligner que l'Assemblée nationale a institué une mission d'information sur l'assujettissement à la fiscalité américaine des Français nés aux États-Unis dont les co-rapporteurs sont les deux députés Marc Le Fur (LR) et Laurent Saint-Martin (LREM). Il sera intéressant de voir les solutions qu'ils envisagent...

Lire la suite...
13 avril 2018
Ouest France

Ouest France

Les Français, nés aux États-Unis mais qui n’y ont jamais vécu, sont la cible du fisc américain. En un an, le nombre d’adhérents de l’association de défense, créée à Gourin, a explosé.


Ils sont nés sur le sol français d’au moins un parent américain, ou sur le sol américain, d’au moins un parent français. Ils n’ont passé que quelques semaines ou quelques années d’enfance aux États-Unis. On les appelle les Américains accidentels.

Jusqu'à 118 000 €
Aujourd'hui, les Français, nés par hasard outre-Atlantique, sont au cœur d’un imbroglio juridique. L’administration américaine leur réclame le paiement d’impôts, alors qu’ils n’ont pas ou très peu vécu aux États-Unis. Depuis 2014, en effet, le Foreign account tax compliance act (Facta), destiné à lutter contre l’évasion fiscale, permet à l’administration fiscale américaine de demander aux banques étrangères des informations sur la situation de leurs clients désignés comme « personnes américaines ».

Les sommes réclamées peuvent être conséquentes : jusqu’à 118 000 € pour cet Américain accidentel qui a fait une plus-value sur la vente d’un bien. Les personnes, prises dans ce guêpier, ne peuvent même pas en sortir en renonçant à la nationalité américaine car la procédure est complexe et coûteuse : entre 15 000 et 20 000 €.

Action diplomatique
L'Association des Américains accidentels (AAA), créée en avril 2017, à Gourin, fait du lobbying auprès des élus, vient d'obtenir le soutien de la majorité présidentielle. Le député finistérien, Richard Ferrand, a demandé au Premier ministre, Edouard Philippe, une action diplomatique forte auprès des États-Unis pour trouver une solution.

Par ailleurs, le député des Côtes-d’Armor, Marc Le Fur, chargé d'une mission d’information sur l’assujettissement à la fiscalité américaine des Français nés aux États-Unis, va demander à Emmanuel Macron d’inscrire le sujet à l’ordre du jour de sa visite aux États-Unis, du 23 au 25 avril prochains.

Lire la suite...
3 avril 2018
“Américains accidentels”: un élu en appelle à Macron et Trump

“Américains accidentels”: un élu en appelle à Macron et Trump



Donald Trump reçoit Emmanuel Macron en visite d’Etat du 23 au 25 avril. Et le député Les...

Lire la suite...
24 mars 2018
«Américains accidentels» : l'Assemblée nationale s'empare du dossier

«Américains accidentels» : l'Assemblée nationale s'empare du dossier

Une mission sur la situation des Français «Américains accidentels» a été confiée à Marc Le Fur,...

Lire la suite...
16 mars 2018
La nationalité américaine, un cadeau fiscal empoisonné ?

La nationalité américaine, un cadeau fiscal empoisonné ?

La nationalité américaine, un cadeau fiscal empoisonné ? Depuis la signature d'un accord fiscal franco-américain, des contribuables français n'ayant jamais résidé outre Atlantique se retrouvent poursuivis par le fisc américain. Ces Américains accidentels. Appercu ...

Lire la suite...
28 février 2018
French ‘Américains Accidentels’ get boost from en Marche party leader

French ‘Américains Accidentels’ get boost from en Marche party leader

A recently-formed French-American lobbying group, l'Association des Américains Accidentels, has received potentially-significant support in its battle against its members' US tax obligations from the Emmanuel Macron's La République en Marche party, in the form of a letter from the party's leader to French

Lire la suite...
26 février 2018
QUAND LE FISC AMÉRICAIN TRAQUE LES CONTRIBUABLES FRANÇAIS

QUAND LE FISC AMÉRICAIN TRAQUE LES CONTRIBUABLES FRANÇAIS

ENQUÊTE - Nés aux États-Unis au gré de mutations professionnelles de leurs parents, des Français qui n'y ont jamais vécu se retrouvent, depuis fin 2013, poursuivis par le fisc américain. En cause ? Un dispositif d'échange des données bancaires.

Lire la suite...
21 février 2018
La République en marche au côté des «Américains accidentels»

La République en marche au côté des «Américains accidentels»

L'Association des Américains Accidentels (AAA) commence à entrevoir la fin du cauchemar fiscal que vivent ses adhérents. Après avoir longtemps bataillé pour faire entendre leurs voix, ces Français nés aux Etats-Unis où ils n'ont vécu que les premiers mois de leur vie, sans y avoir jamais étudié ni ...

Lire la suite...
20 février 2018
‘Accidental Americans’ in France looking to French gov’t for help

‘Accidental Americans’ in France looking to French gov’t for help

A group of French citizens who – as they insist on putting it – the US government considers to be Americans as well are looking to rally the support of the French government, in a new campaign aimed at freeing themselves from what they regard as a hugely unfair tax burden they're required to bear as a

Lire la suite...
12 février 2018
Des Français dans le collimateur du fisc américain

Des Français dans le collimateur du fisc américain

Depuis trois ans, l'administration fiscale des États-Unis enjoint aux Français nés outre-Atlantique de régulariser leur situation... Certains se révoltent.

Lire la suite...
9 février 2018
Le cauchemar fiscal de ces Français nés aux Etats-Unis

Le cauchemar fiscal de ces Français nés aux Etats-Unis

Nés aux Etats-Unis mais n'ayant plus aucune attache avec ce pays, des Français sont rattrapés par le fisc

Lire la suite...
2 février 2018
«L'impression d'avoir été piégés»

«L'impression d'avoir été piégés»

Résidente de Colomiers, Dominique a découvert sa double nationalité en 2015, à l'âge de 58 ans....

Lire la suite...
27 décembre 2017
La fin du cauchemar fiscal pour les «Américains accidentels» ?

La fin du cauchemar fiscal pour les «Américains accidentels» ?

Victimes collatérales d'un accord anti-fraude, des milliers de Français nés aux Etats-Unis par...

Lire la suite...
27 décembre 2017
"On marche sur la tête": le calvaire fiscal des "Américains accidentels"

"On marche sur la tête": le calvaire fiscal des "Américains accidentels"

Quand Gérard Bouscharain a appris qu'il était Américain, il a d'abord pensé à une blague, puis...

Lire la suite...
19 décembre 2017
Banque : les conséquences étonnantes de l'accord FATCA

Banque : les conséquences étonnantes de l'accord FATCA

Pour faire la chasse aux fraudeurs, le fisc américain a obtenu que les banques hors de ses...

Lire la suite...
11 décembre 2017
Fisc américain. Il raconte son calvaire

Fisc américain. Il raconte son calvaire

Ce Breton connaît, comme des dizaines d'autres, un véritable calvaire. Né aux États-Unis mais...

Lire la suite...
28 novembre 2017
Les “Américains accidentels”, oubliés de la réforme fiscale de Trump

Les “Américains accidentels”, oubliés de la réforme fiscale de Trump

Ils sont nés aux Etats-Unis mais n’y ont vécu que quelques mois. Pas assez pour se sentir...

Lire la suite...
21 novembre 2017
Le calvaire fiscal de ces Auvergnats devenus des "Américains accidentels"

Le calvaire fiscal de ces Auvergnats devenus des "Américains accidentels"

De parents français, ces Auvergnats, fils et filles d'employés Michelin à Greenville, sont nés...

Lire la suite...
17 octobre 2017
Suivant
Fermer En poursuivant votre navigation sur ce site, vous acceptez l'utilisation de cookies et notre Politique de Confidentialité. En savoir plus